US Supreme Court Landmark Decision on Protecting LGBTQ Workers

In a historic 6-3 decision, the United States Supreme Court in Bostock v. Clayton County, Georgia held that Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which makes it illegal for employers to discriminate because of a person’s sex, and other factors, also extends to cover discrimination based on sexual orientation and transgender status. This long-awaited ruling is a major victory for LGBTQ employees!

The Court here adopted a broad interpretation of the term “sex” under Title VII to extend employment protections to all members of the LGBTQ community. Notably, the Court’s decision clearly outlines that “An employer violates Title VII when it intentionally fires an individual employee based in part on sex. . . . [b]ecause discrimination on the basis of homosexuality or transgender status requires an employer to intentionally treat individual employees differently because of their sex, an employer who intentionally penalizes an employee for being homosexual or transgender also violates Title VII.” This ruling is a major shift in the employment law landscape, as it provides nation-wide protection for all LGBTQ employees. To stay up to date with important employment law updates and what it means for your business, please contact the Employer Lawyers at Chauvel & Glatt.

The material in this article, provided by Chauvel & Glatt, is designed to provide informative and current information as of the date of the post. It should not be considered, nor is it intended to constitute, legal advice or promise similar outcomes.  For information on your particular circumstances, please contact Chauvel & Glatt at 650-573-9500.

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