“Love is Blind” Reality TV Contestant Brings Labor Law Complaint

In June 2022, Jeremy Hartwell (“Hartwell”), a former contestant on the second season of the reality TV show “Love is Blind” filed a lawsuit against the show’s producers in Los Angeles Superior Court. The suit alleges multiple labor law violations, including inadequate pay and inhumane working conditions. The defendants named within the complaint include Netflix, the show’s streaming provider, as well as Kinetic Content and Delirium TV, the show’s production company and casting company.

Hartwell is suing for unpaid wages, monetary damages for unfair business practices, compensation for missed meal breaks, and civil penalties for various labor code violations. According to the complaint, contestants on the show “Love is Blind” worked up to 20 hours per day while being paid only $1,000 per week by the defendants. Thus, contestants were allegedly subject to earning as little as $7.14 per hour, significantly below Los Angeles’s minimum wage. In the suit, Hartwell also alleges that he was deprived of access to food and water but was given ample access to alcohol while on the show’s set or at his hotel. The next court appearance in the case is scheduled to take place on September 16, 2022. While we will keep you updated on the status of this lawsuit, employers should take this time to review your practices to ensure that you compliant with California’s strict wage and hour law.  To learn more about the importance of correctly and timely paying wages, providing meal and rest breaks, and ensuring your business is California labor complaint, please contact the Employer Lawyers at Chauvel & Glatt.

This material in this article, provided by Chauvel & Glatt, is designed to provide informative and current information as of the date of the post. It should not be considered, nor is it intended to constitute legal advice.  For information on your particular circumstances, please contact  Chauvel & Glatt at 650-573-9500 for legal assistance near you.

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